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COUNT THE KICKS! - CHARITY POST




I was a very worried pregnant lady, if an hour had passed and I hadn’t felt a kick or a hiccup or any movement for that matter I went into panic mode. A few times we did have genuine concerns and we wouldn’t have felt him move for about 6 hours and we would then try everything we could to get Lucas to move and if all else failed then a couple of times yes we did end up in the obstetric ward to get him to move and without fail they found him and got him moving.I didn’t realise how important counting the kicks were until sadly during my pregnancy two people had still borns, one at 22 weeks and one at 41 weeks and that is purely terrifying. Still borns and late miscarriages are far to common and hopefully one day the statistics will drop and we can have more healthy babies and less heartbreak.The signsYou should start to feel baby move approx. 18-20 weeks.Movements can be kicks, punches, swooshes, flips or turns. (Not hiccups)Make notes from around 20 weeks of your baby’s regular patterns.Learn what is normal from around 20 weeks.If you haven’t felt baby move from 24 weeks call midwife to arrange a scan to check for any concerns. There is no set pattern of what is normal for an unborn baby as every baby is different so it is important to get to know their individual pattern. As your baby develops, both the number and type of movements will change with your baby’s activity pattern. Usually, afternoon and evening periods are times of peak activity for your baby. During both day and night, your baby has sleep periods that mostly last between 20 and 40 minutes, and are rarely longer than 90 minutes. Your baby will usually not move during these sleep periods.Babies movements shouldn’t reduce as you get closer to due date, they should continue the same up until labour.How to prompt baby to move.Recognise what prompts your baby’s movements. Things that may prompt your baby to kick are eating or drinking certain things like cold or hot drinks, fizzy drinks, ice or sugary food like chocolate. The reason is the digestive tract runs past the uterus and so something cold going past can stimulate the baby. However do not consume large quantities of something to prompt your baby to kick as this may give indigestion or gurgles you may mistake for movements and give false reassurance. If your baby doesn’t move when initially prompted, try another method or call your midwife. Other prompts for your baby may be lying on your left side, changing position or rubbing your belly.Never feel silly for calling the maternity ward or midwife, you’ll soon regret it if something was seriously wrong and if it’s not then you get to feel relieved quicker than waiting for the kick. You will never be made to feel stupid or like a time waster you will always be encouraged to be safe then sorry. If you want support, to donate or just for more information click this link to go to the Count the kicks website.Lets try to lower the risks together. Mum’s and dad’s together.Lets attempt to stop heartache.




I was a very worried pregnant lady, if an hour had passed and I hadn’t felt a kick or a hiccup or any movement for that matter I went into panic mode. A few times we did have genuine concerns and we wouldn’t have felt him move for about 6 hours and we would then try everything we could to get Lucas to move and if all else failed then a couple of times yes we did end up in the obstetric ward to get him to move and without fail they found him and got him moving.
I didn’t realise how important counting the kicks were until sadly during my pregnancy two people had still borns, one at 22 weeks and one at 41 weeks and that is purely terrifying. Still borns and late miscarriages are far to common and hopefully one day the statistics will drop and we can have more healthy babies and less heartbreak.

The signs
  • You should start to feel baby move approx. 18-20 weeks.
  • Movements can be kicks, punches, swooshes, flips or turns. (Not hiccups)
  • Make notes from around 20 weeks of your baby’s regular patterns.
  • Learn what is normal from around 20 weeks.
  • If you haven’t felt baby move from 24 weeks call midwife to arrange a scan to check for any concerns. 
There is no set pattern of what is normal for an unborn baby as every baby is different so it is important to get to know their individual pattern. As your baby develops, both the number and type of movements will change with your baby’s activity pattern. Usually, afternoon and evening periods are times of peak activity for your baby. During both day and night, your baby has sleep periods that mostly last between 20 and 40 minutes, and are rarely longer than 90 minutes. Your baby will usually not move during these sleep periods.
Babies movements shouldn’t reduce as you get closer to due date, they should continue the same up until labour.
How to prompt baby to move.
Recognise what prompts your baby’s movements. Things that may prompt your baby to kick are eating or drinking certain things like cold or hot drinks, fizzy drinks, ice or sugary food like chocolate. The reason is the digestive tract runs past the uterus and so something cold going past can stimulate the baby. However do not consume large quantities of something to prompt your baby to kick as this may give indigestion or gurgles you may mistake for movements and give false reassurance. If your baby doesn’t move when initially prompted, try another method or call your midwife. Other prompts for your baby may be lying on your left side, changing position or rubbing your belly.
Never feel silly for calling the maternity ward or midwife, you’ll soon regret it if something was seriously wrong and if it’s not then you get to feel relieved quicker than waiting for the kick. You will never be made to feel stupid or like a time waster you will always be encouraged to be safe then sorry.

If you want support, to donate or just for more information click this link to go to the Count the kicks website.
Lets try to lower the risks together. Mum’s and dad’s together.
Lets attempt to stop heartache.